South-South University

 

SPECIALIZATION AND INTERNATIONAL COURSE – EPISTEMOLOGIES OF THE SOUTH
3rd Cohort (2018-2019)

• Virtual mode.

• General coordination: Boaventura de Sousa Santos (Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal)

• Academic coordination: Karina Bidaseca (CLACSO, National University of San Martín and Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina) and Maria Paula Meneses (Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal)

Specialization: 480 hours/Chair
International Course: 120 hours/Chair
Duration: April 2018 to March 2019
 

Overview

We live in turbulent and complex times. In this backdrop, the Epistemologies of the South provide theoretical and methodological tools allowing the development of a critical diagnosis of the present which has as its essential element the possibility of reconstructing, reformulating and legitimating alternatives for a more equitable and free society.

The Specialization and the International Course are based on three main axes of the Epistemologies of the South: 1. That the interpretation of the world overcomes the Eurocentric interpretation of the same; 2. That it is not possible to have global social justice without global cognitive justice; 3. That the emancipatory transformations produced in the world cannot be confined to the grammars and scripts developed by the critical theory focused on the Global South; on the contrary, the Epistemologies of the South claim a diversity that is possible to recognise and value.

This training ground, centred on the promotion of interdisciplinary South-South dialogues, endeavours to register and interpret the resistances to colonialism, to capitalism and to patriarchy in our societies. At the same time, the aim is to study the Global South in all its diversity, a South that metaphorically represents a wide field of economic, social, cultural and political innovation of increasing diversity, in which the dialogues between knowledges reflect the pluriversality conditions.

Recipients

The Specialization and the International Course are addressed to undergraduate and postgraduate students, teachers at all the various levels of education, activists and militants of social movements, organisations and political parties, members of civil society, journalists, communicators and press workers, members and managers of non-governmental organisations and professionals interested in social and political themes portraying the diversity of the global South.

Teaching Staff (International Course and Specialization)

Ángeles Castaño Madroñal (University of Seville, Spain)
Boaventura de Sousa Santos (Centre for Social Studies of the University of Coimbra, Portugal)
Carla Braga (Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique)
Cristiano Gianolla (Centre for Social Studies of the University of Coimbra, Portugal)
Gladys Tzul Tzul (Institute Amaq', Guatemala)
Ileana de las Mercedes Hodge Limonta (Cuban Academy of Sciences, Cuba)
Ivani Ferreira de Faria (Federal University of Amazonas, Brazil)
Jason Fernandes (ISCTE, Lisbon, Portugal)
João Arriscado Nunes (Centre for Social Studies of the University of Coimbra, Portugal)
Jorge Ramos Tolosa (University of Valencia, Spain)
José Gandarilla (National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico)
Juan Carlos Gimeno Martín (Universidade Autónoma de Madrid, Spain)
Karina Bidaseca (National University of San Martin and Universidade de Buenos Aires, Argentina)
Leonardo Avritzer (Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil)
María Antonieta Antonacci (Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo, Brazil)
María Paula Meneses (Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal and Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique)
María Haydeé García Bravo (National Autonomous University of Mexico)
Mario Rufer (Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Mexico)
Marisa Gonçalves (Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal)
Marta Sierra (Kenyon College, United States of America)
Nilma Gomes (Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil)
Orlando Aragón Andrade (Escuela Nacional de Estudios Superiores, campus Morelia of the National Autonomous University of Mexico)
Rosalva Aída Hernández (Center for Research and Advanced Studies in Social Anthropology, Mexico)
Sandra Silva Carvalho (Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal)
Sara Araújo (Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal)
Teresa Cruz e Silva (Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique)
Teresa Cunha (Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal)


Academic Structure

The International Course will have an annual duration and requires participating in the discussion forums and the submitting of a final paper for its accreditation.
The Specialization will have an annual duration and requires the completion of the International Course; attending 2 optional virtual seminars of the curricular contents; attending a preparatory workshop to prepare the final paper and the conduction of a final monograph for its accreditation.

The Specialization and the International Course in Epistemologies of the South will take place between April 2018 and March 2019.

The virtual seminars and the International Course classes will be held either in Spanish or Portuguese, indistinctly. Bibliography will be available in both the official languages of the course, subject to availability. Students interventions in the discussion forums will also be held in the two languages. The final monograph may be submitted either in Portuguese or in Spanish.

Students of both the Specialization and International Course will benefit from support of academic tutors who will monitor the virtual seminars progress and will provide guidance in the execution of the final papers.

The International Course also seeks to build another library and a cartography of social movements where other voices and knowledges will find space and visibility, challenging the epistemic and epistemological subalternization attempts.

Once seminars are concluded, students will have a 4-month deadline to submit their final papers, by the end of July 2019, included. In case students have one incomplete seminar, the same deadline applies for the conclusion of the seminar.


Curricular Proposal

INTERNATIONAL COURSE: Justice among knowledges – The Epistemologies of the South and knowledge born in struggle

This International course on the Epistemologies of the South, term coined by Boaventura de Sousa Santos, aims at introducing and debating knowledges produced in the global South, a basis for reflection on the social transformation in the present times.  In other words, by studying the different possibilities unveiled by the Epistemologies of the South, the theoretical and methodological objectives of the course are to go beyond the modern Eurocentric thinking paradigm, namely, the abyssal thinking.

To learn from the South and with the South entails a different political and epistemic orientation. The global South, central topic of this course, seeks to acknowledge and validate the knowledge produced by the oppressed, by women and men who have suffered and still suffer injustice, oppression, domination and exclusion caused by capitalism, colonialism and patriarchy. The Epistemologies of the South as a metaphor of abyssal exclusions, silencing and destruction of people and knowledges, seek to embody the knowledges and experiences of the global South based on methodological and reflexive assumptions in dialogue, against any other ethnocentric proposal.

This course lecturers will seek to problematize, from different geopolitical and epistemic places, the conditions for a horizontal dialogue between knowledges, for the ecologies of knowledge. These dialogues and the learning processes they contain, reflect the innovations occurring in countries and regions of the global South. This demanding commitment entails openness for mutual recognition, an intercultural understanding, a political and ideological convergence, respect for identity and a celebration of diversity, as the conditions for a democratic dialogue in the global South.

Building knowledge from the Epistemologies of the South requires other work methodologies. Learning from the South in its diversity means going beyond the conventional academic knowledge. Building dialogues between different knowledges and struggles aims at giving visibility to people and to social groups whose practices are built from those knowledges. Only then it will be possible to develop alternative narratives questioning the impossibility of thinking difference (sexual, ethnic, racial, of classes, castes, religious, etc.) with equality, the intimate connection between local and global, projects of other economies and other political societies. The second half of the course aims at mapping, presenting and discussing a variety of work methodologies brought up by the body of knowledge, developed from the perspectives of the Epistemologies of the South, favouring the ecology of knowledges and the possibilities of intercultural translation between knowledges born in struggles.


Lecturers of the International Course

· Ángeles Castaño Madroñal (University of Seville, Spain)
· Boaventura de Sousa Santos (Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal)
· Carla Braga (Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique)
· Gladys Tzul Tzul (Meritorious Autonomous University of Puebla, Mexico)
· Ileana de las Mercedes Hodge Limonta (Cuban Academic of Sciences, Cuba)
· Ivani Ferreira de Faria (Federal University of Amazonas, Brazil)
· Jorge Ramos Tolosa (University of Valência, Spain)
· Juan Carlos Gimeno Martín (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain)
· Karina Bidaseca (National University of San Martín and Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina)
· Leonardo Avritzer (Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil)
· Jason Fernandes (ISCTE, Lisbon, Portugal)
· João Arriscado Nunes (Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal)
· José Manuel Mendes (Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal)
· María Antonieta Antonacci (Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo, Brazil)
· Maria Paula Meneses (Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal  and Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique)
· Mario Rufer (Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Mexico)
· Nilma Gomes (Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil)
· Orlando Aragón Andrade (Escuela Nacional de Estudios Superiores campus Morelia, National Autonomous University of Mexico)
· Rosalva Aída Hernández (Centre for Research and Advanced Studies in Social Anthropology, Mexico)
· Sara Araújo (Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal)
· Teresa Cruz e Silva (Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique)


Workshop Supporting the Elaboration of the Monograph

This workshop aims at providing support in the elaboration of the final paper of the Specialization in Epistemologies of the South. It will provide support in the identification of the theme to be adopted in the final paper of the International Course, linking the themes approached in the International Course with the research/action interests and with students’ specific trajectories.  It pursuits to support in the identification and justification of the theme to be addressed; to consolidate the conceptual and methodological instruments approached over the International Course; to support in the elaboration of the final paper which can be in written or in audio-visual, performing or in any other format. 

Work will be conducted in groups guided by tutors who will discuss in the forums, over the course of 3 months.


OPTIONAL SEMINARS

1. Challenges to Democracies in the 21st Century
Coordination: Sandra Silva Carvalho and Cristiano Gianolla (Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra).

Overview:The seminar seeks to foster a critical reflection on contemporary democratic theories and practices in the various fields, contexts and scales. An international team of lecturers with complementary knowledges and experiences will approach the theme from differing points of view and realities, from a critical eye on the concepts of democracy and its practices. The (new) forms of resistance in low intensity democracies will be given special attention, both at theoretical and practical level. Each lecturer will start by characterizing democracy situated in a given context and scale, which will be the subject of further debate; the lecturer will then define the challenges and will conclude with a critical reading of the responses given by institutions, citizens, communities and by the movements, focusing on those pointing to the strengthening of democratic practices.


2. Feminist ecology of knowledges
Coordination: Teresa Cunha (Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra).

Overview: The seminar is based on the theoretical premise of Boaventura de Sousa Santos, according to which there is no social justice without cognitive justice. This interpellation questions all the feminist sociological imagination which unites and homogenises the intense diversity and infinite possibilities of knowledges and experiences available in the world. Taking the ecology of knowledges as a conceptual source, one chooses to go even further: seeking to acknowledge, value and validate feminist ecologies of knowledges. .


3. Memories, social struggles and reconciliation processes built from the ecologies of knowledge
Coordination: Marisa Gonçalves and Maria Paula Meneses (Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra and Eduardo Mondlane University).

Overview: In very different settings of the global South, debates around the official/national narratives on the history of countries, and people and communities’ individual and/or collective memories oftentimes are not in line with the significance of the nationalist struggle for independence and against colonialism, capitalism and patriarchy. These memories form a powerful “archive” to which many generations access to articulate their own conceptions of identity and nation, as well as to claim their rights and the access to social and cognitive justice and to social and economic welfare, as this course puts forward for discussion, from different frameworks, but privileging oral and alternative narratives defying the oficial histories.

4. Women’s struggles in the South: Latin America, Africa and the East
Coordination: Karina Bidaseca (National University of General San Martín and University of Buenos Aires).

Overview: This seminar addresses the genealogies of women’s struggles against the present experiences of coloniality as a disruptive cultural fact in the pluriversality, presenting itself in the so-called Other Souths: Other Africas, Other Easts, Other Asias, Other Oceanias, Other Europes. Indigenous and peasant women’s struggles against agrobusiness; Saharawi refugee women; the agency of Muslim women; Afro-descendants and African women, Palestinian and Asian women, constitute a real sample of the impacts of power on the lives of the communities of the South affected by wars and muzzling. Crossing disciplinary boundaries, the course will focus on the current contributions of black Caribbean feminist writers and African feminists;  on the studies of the afro feminism intersectionality, decolonial and postcolonial feminism, on the aesthetics of various artists, as well as on the ethnographies conducted in the East providing information on the real and the symbolic levels, the ethereal lives at the borders between the West and its others, the racialisation of the bodies written under the script of cultural fundamentalisms.


5. Race/blackness and humanity. Intercultural translations between Latin American, Caribbean and Africa
Coordination: José Gandarilla (National Autonomous University of Mexico) and María Haydeé García Bravo (National Autonomous University of Mexico)

Overview: The issue of the “black man” and his “blackness” and humanity is at the heart of contemporary debates on racism and colonial and postcolonial violence. In the discussions on the “Negritude” movement created by Aimé Césaire, it is undeniable that there is a “mythical” dimension in the imaginary of the return to Africa, which is then questioned by the afro-Antillean authors - creolists – as Edouard Glissant, Patrick Chamoiseau, among others. For Glissant, the only possible extension of this concept was "the act by which it is surpassed”, for it ends when "self-possession" begins. In the 1950’s, Frantz Fanon problematized the racial nature of the Eurocentric epistemology, building the black in a “region where he is not a man”. On the other side of the Atlantic, in Africa, the colonial issue was advocated also as a critique of eurocentrism and of African/black centrality in the history of the world; the debates on African Philosophy, among others, which are either unknown in Latin America and the Caribbean or are tied to Eurocentric representations. A dialogue between intellectuals who challenge the hierarchy and inequality relations between North-South, based on a capitalist monocultural logic is an invitation to think on the historicity of those dialogues crossed by intercultural translation practices which face and subvert the colonial projects embodied in what Valetin Mudimbe defines as “colonial library”.

6. Colonial aesthetics from the South. Art, Memory and Bodies
Coordination: Marta Sierra (Kenyon College) and Karina Bidaseca (National University of General San Martín and University of Buenos Aires).

Overview: The amnesia of the empire and the silenced pasts affect our memory and the insurgent ways of representing otherness, particularly the afro-descendants and native people of the South, in which coloniality survives. Therefore, what Edward Said defined as “permission to narrate”, concerned the survival as an act of resistance in Palestine, living in a “Tempo Presente (Tenso)” or “Present Tense”, as defined by the exiled Palestinian artist Mona Hatoum. The seminar aims at discussing the decolonization of discourses and of the imaginaries in the historical representation and its (im)possibility within modernity/coloniality time and space limits, from the artistic and cultural production in which/through which emancipatory practices of re(ex)sistance are invented.


STRUCTURE AND TIMEFRAME

SEE ANNEX

For further information please visit CLACSO webpage