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Editorial

One Hundred Years that Shook the World

1917’s Russian revolution indelibly marked the history of the 20th century. In February, Czarism was overturned and a reputedly liberal regime was established, which was intent on continuing the war. After a tumultuous few months, the Bolsheviks gained power in October. The successes and failures of that socialist revolution and the USSR (Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) remain, today, reason for political and historiographical debate. Given the utopian power that directly or indirectly irradiated from the October revolution, as well as the place of this radical transformation's practices and projects in the definition of our contemporaneity, questioning this revolution means casting a critical eye over the changes which have occurred throughout the 20th century and over the nature of today’s imagery of social justice and liberation.

Whether as liberating hypothesis or tragic perversion, the Russian revolution remains relevant today. Not only because it feeds a growing array of political and academic analyses, but also because, whether representing hope, deadlock or limitation, it allows us to think about the emancipatory struggles that animated the 20th century, as well as alternative possibilities for a better world for everyone.

With this in mind, CES decided to promote an international colloquium entitled “One hundred years that shook the world: emancipatory hypotheses,” to be held on the 24th and 25th of November 2017. The centenary of the event is therefore an analytical opportunity to think about experiences and projects that, in its wake and beyond, have been building alternative paths to capitalism, colonialism and patriarchy. The full programme appears in this issue.

In this event, we will reflect upon systemic alternatives to capitalism as well as the endless crises fed by that system. We will enquire into the political and ideological legacies that the Russian Revolution continues to raise. We will also look at how feminist imagery highlights the need for analysis to include all oppression inscribed in unequal power relations. Finally, we will discuss the role of social struggles and their connection with emancipatory hypotheses in today's world, within a framework in which the post-democratic, misogynist, neoliberal and colonialist forces invade and populate the political horizons of a great part of humanity.
 

Organising committee
João Rodrigues, Miguel Cardina, Teresa Almeida Cravo and Teresa Cunha

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